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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
terms. >> but familiarity doesn't always do the trick. here's president clinton after his re-election in 1996. >> in modern times, second terms for presidents have been either disappointing or disastrous. i wonder if you have drawn any lessons on why that is so. >> the things which derail a second term are basically three. one is some external event intervenes and the president can't fulfill his dreams or hopes for his agenda. sometimes a president thinks he has more of a mandate than he does and tries to do too much. and the third is that sometimes a president essentially just runs out of steam. >> in a november of 1972 after two weeks of reflection at camp david, president richard nixon told reporters, my study of elections in this country is that second terms almost inevitably are downhill. yes, richard nixon said that in '72. after a string of legislative successes in his first term and after narrowly winning a second term as president, president bush claimed a mandate. >> when you win, there is a feeling that the people have spoken and embraced your point of view. and th
department come before the congress. meanwhile, secretary of state clinton remains out of sight recovering from this concushion that she apparently suffered when she fell down because she was diof dehydrated from the stomach virus or something. do we have any more details on how that happened or-- where did she hit her head? do we know? >> or when? >> when? well, it was last saturday that they decided that she-- this concussion was serious enough for her to warrant staying at home. but we don't believe it happened that day in particular. but the timing is, obviously, critical in terms of what you're talking about with benghazi because she was supposed to testify this past week. she's since indicated she's willing to do something, perhaps, in january with the senate foreign relations and house foreign affairs to answer some of the questions. but in the meantime, this report has come out, ben harshly critical of the state department, and the place is really sort of reeling. i mean, you have the top three security fors within diplomatic security forced out the door. and you've got a heck of a
in virginia. it was propose bided by bill clinton the year after the columbine shooting and they set up legislation called cops in the school program. has not been fully funded. a lot of schools don't have it. what we were saying is really the question that parents across this country are asking is how do we protect our kids? >> schieffer: a couple reactions. the president of the international association of police chiefs says, number one, this is totally impractical. he says he happens to be the chief in the freemont, california. he said if you put police officer in every school in freemont, he'd have to put half his police force there. we all know the budget constraints that all these governments are under. on the other side, the president of the national education association says we do not need guns in schools, period. >> well, they need protection. the kids need protection. bill clinton thought they needed protection. the israelis have tested it, and it works there. you know, what we've suggested that each school district and each school administrator look at the problem that they
advisory board and also was president clinton how usual is this cell that we're hearing about? >> you know, candy, while there is a discussion, there was a statement put out by the emirates, we don't know very much about the details. typically the emirates is an infrastructure place, right? it's where they provide support, the terrorist groups look for support that counter pro live rag, banking. we don't often see operational terrorist cells and that's what makes this different. the emirates has a capable counterterrorism force and work very closely with saudi arabia and we have to presume that there was real cooperation because the targets were supposed to be in the emirates and saudi arabia but we don't know much beyond that. >> you know, i want to get this quote exactly right. this is from the official em rate news agency and materials aiming to conduct terrorist attacks. so this is not a region that you want people exporting material and equipment for terrorist attacks. how concerning is that part of the operation? >> it's very concerning. in fact, the statement itself suggests that th
and secretary of state hillary clinton who is leaving. her likely successor was nominated on friday by the president. >> today, though, i'm looking ahead to my second term. i'm very proud to announce my choice for america's next secretary of state, john kerry. >> that announcement took place eight days of susan rice the ambassador to the united nations removed herself from the nomination. it was over interviews she gave on the attacks of benghazi. the attacks came even though she was never nominated. with rice out, kerry is in. as yet, president obama has made no nomination for secretary of defense to replace the pentagon chief, leon panetta. the short list is very short indeed, chuck hagel. the senator from nebraska. he's the front-runner to succeed panetta. at least conservatives are treating him that way and using the tactics they used against susan rice and on one detail, israel. he once warned of the intimidating influence of the jewish lobby and said this in a 2006 interview while in office. >> i'm a united states senator, not an israeli senator. i'm a united states senator. i
in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, it he served as a leading u.s. trader and .arned the rank of staff thaman he was described as antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed,
person over $250,000 who would be subject to clinton dasher are tax rates and we're told this is not a big deal. most seniors are not living particularly well. we have the data on that. roughly 40% rely on their social security check with averages over $1200 a month for 90% or more of their income. 70% rely on it for more than half their income so the idea of these high-living seniors, i don't need my check, that's fine. send it back. very few people like you, pete. this is a big deal. >> there's even a question as to why we're dealing with the social security problem. it's not part of the deficit anyway, except for the part that should be dealt with later on. >> i keep getting into this thing, it's semantics. it's not just part of the budget but the other part of the story is it's a program that overthe long reason faces a shortfall. i know how i want it resolved but at the end of the day we'll probably see some amount of benefit cuts and some amount of revenue increases, whatever you call it. if you have unilateral benefit cuts you've given away a large part of the stor
sympathetic to conservative candidates. but they were very strong for jimmy carter, too. and for bill clinton, because they were southerners and themselves were of the faith and persuasions. but there were some of factors going on this time and this election. the obama team at the national level but at such a job, such an excellent job turning out its vote. the republican team did not. if you look at the same voters and how they are voting at state level and local level, you will get a different picture. we have a republican congress, a pretty conservative republican congress. people were comfortable voting for those folks. we look at governors, we have 30 republican governors now. so, many of the same people split their vote. they went for barack obama on the national level and when four republicans on local level. it is always more complicated. host: what is the future been like for the republican party? guest: we have no future. haven't you heard? we are done and finished. host: how do they deal on what seal -- guest: do have to argue for your point of view. i do not think we made a good a
senator hillary clinton stopped by with her chief of staff to wish me a happy birthday the first year she was in the senate. it was just a few months after she hadrrived, and my staff was surprised -- and possibly a bit star-struck -- to see the former first lady walk into the room. we went on to work together in vital voices, a global partnership dedicated to supporting and empowering women leaders and social entrepreneurs in emerging economies. we alsoeamed up with senators mikulski and collins to assure public schools had the option to offer single-sex schools and classes. after i visited with secretary of education rod paige, the young women's leadership academy in the harlem area of new york city -- one of the fir and most successful pilot projects for girls puc public schools wih which i know the presiding officer is very familiar. anand the i remember the time i invited senator barbara mikulski to texas. because she has and i have worked together supporting nasa for so many years, and this year she chair and i am the ranking member of the subcommittee. we went to the space center b
. the current debate is different, do not forget. after having surpluses at the end of the clinton administration, we went into debt almost a decade ago -- deficits almost a decade ago. the problems have gotten more difficult. at the moment, we have some interesting changes. you talk about 30 years since reagan. the country is getting older, so medicare, medicaid, social security costs more, but we have also had a lot of tax cuts. revenue is at the smallest amount since 1950. if we just got revenue back up to historical average, a deficit would be about $500 billion less than a career that is. the problem with that much more smaller. economists would then say that it is not much of a problem. the history is rather sordid, you are right. host: let me go to "the national journal." three reasons why mitch mcconnell will not save the fiscal cliff negotiations. the first one, most importantly, he is missing his dance partner joe biden. he has been kept on the sidelines during negotiations. some republicans think his absence is a sign that the president is not serious about closing a dea
or not. the memorial service for byrd in west virginia, this is where clinton said there is nothing he would not have done for you, meaning the people of west virginia as long as you did not cross the constitutional line. a powerful statement. one of the administration i talked about is the carter administration. when you look at byrd's work with president carter, you realize how much legislation is accomplished in those congresses. incredible. carter's failures are basically external. oil and cargo driving up inflation are beyond carter's control. but what carter and byrd did -- carter was a difficult person, but they were able to bring together. it was a truly successful administration legislatively. the most important environmental laws we have today came out of the carter administration. carter enacted an energy program, which if reagan had not wiped out come would have saved us the problems you are having today. but reagan wiped it out. ira is correct to talk about the congress of the last great senate. byrd's first two terms as senate majority leader, it was byrd who made it happ
the political hero should be hillary clinton. host: why is that? caller: she has kept peace around the world. she has been able to focus on the problems here in america while she is done a tremendous job overseas. host: what would you like to see out of there? caller: become the next president of united states. i think it is a strong possibility. you mentioned travel and keeping people safe. any specific accomplishment that sticks out in your mind? caller: meeting with the pakistanis leaders and going to different countries and dealing with the world issues and being a good negotiator, peacemaker and her demeanor. unbelievable and outstanding. host: ruth from texas, you are on. caller: my hero is mitt romney. if he had been elected, he would have strained things much better than they are now. that is part of the problem. host: what -- caller: character, honesty. host: mitt romney is your choice. caller: that is about it. host: patrick is next. caller: my political hero is president obama. host: why so? caller: he has gone through a lot. he has kept his cool during the course of the year. i l
ronald reagan and bill clinton cut spending. i would take the clinton tax rates, right now, i would take them. gregg: really. >> they won't hurt the economy, if, i got clinton's spending. he spent one-third less on federal government than barack obama is today, one-third less. we've increased the size of the government by over 33%. gregg:er hereby announce you king for a day. you're it. >> oh, please. but that's it. we're spending too much and the only way to afford this kind of spending is to tax everyone. and that's what i'm worried about. we're moving toward a value-added tax. gregg: brian wesbury, good to see you. thanks so much. >> good to see you, gregg. patti ann: greg says he can have the power. can i be queen? gregg: you may. >> this is great story. a man loses a ring on the highway and another person finds it. he is looking for the rightful owner. i hope you're watching! we'll tell you how you can help coming up. >>> a touching story of a fifth grader and how he decided to honor the victims in newtown, connecticut. >> when i heard about sandy hook i felt really bad for all the
to president bill clinton, fox news contributor. terry holt joins us, former bush-cheney national spokesman and former senior advisor to the rnc. good to see you both. doug, what is amazing to a lot of people is that they're not even talking to each other. the last meaningful conversation between the president and boehner, for example, was 10 days ago. look, when you were in the clinton white house that's not the way things worked, right? >> absolutely not, gregg. president clinton and newt gingrich, the then speaker, despite their very real differences were talking all the time. i think at one point they spent a total of almost 35 hours in total together. bottom line, there was always a sense of national purpose that i think is missing here, gregg. bottom line on both side i think there's a lot to be accounted for. gregg: you know, terry, let me put up on the board what this means to the average american. all right. 300 bucks if you're the lowest taxpayer, there you are but you're talking about if you make 40 to 50,000, $1700. go to the next page. look at this. i mean you're talking about
and lower middle class people. so, if everybody says let's go back to the clinton tax rates, that is the clinton tax rates. also, on more spending, the iraq war, we pulled the people out. on c-span about two months ago i turned it on a senate armed services committee. one not seen anybody report this. the state department sent in private contractors at a cost greater than if we would've had our troops in there. it is a fact right now, the figures don't lie, but liars figure. host: thanks for the call. guest: the president's proposal to roll back the bush tax rates for upper-income americans would raise probably about $100 billion a year. that includes higher tax rates on income earned over $250,000, higher estate taxes, and more. it's not going to solve our deficit problem, but it will have an impact. the question is, is that enough, too much, too little, when you combine it with spending cuts, to reduce the deficit to more stable level over the years? host: what we have seen in these negotiations between the principals, how does that portend in terms of what we will see in
california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that are critical in the politics that develop, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative task to them. they tended to be oriented around history of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt, in the south and southwest that we see the rise of what we see by the 1970s is becoming to talk about as the religious right, the rise of evangelical involved in the clinical process in new and important ways. so thurmond was at the forefront of all of those issues in his own politics. national defense, he was a staunch anti-communist. he played an important role in right wing anti-communist populist politics in the late '50s and early 1960s. it's one of the things that led him to switch parties in 1964. he was a key figure in opposing labor unions. he did so alongside
last week nominated john kerry to succeed hillary clinton as secretary of state. here to walk us through the policeman call cause and effect in three states are "newshour" political editor christina and "roll call" we heard today that one of the kennedy h,irs, ted kennedy, junior, decided not to run for the seat in massachusetts, what's happening there? >> more of interesting dynamics at play. whenever a kennedy decides to run in massachusetts he sort of think that clears the field. so when he said he wanted to stay in connecticut, potentially run for something there one day -- >> ifill: which is where he lives. >> exactly. opens up the field for the democrats in a big way. really where everybody is paying attention right now the republican side. senator scott brown just lost the seat very high profile race in 2012 to elizabeth warren, should he choose to run for special election, try to repeat in 2010 to be able to catch democrats by surprise, that could be his seat. but he may not run. there are lot 6 different things at play, he has options down the line, always run for gov
kerry. in the 2008 democratic primary, then senators clinton and obama, they fought about it. they even ended up voting on opposite sides of the issue when it came up for a vote that summer. fisa, and whether or not we already have a government with too much power to spy on us, whether or not there should be more congressional and judicial oversight of that power, whether or not more should be done to protect people's privacy, our country's been having been fights over that tough for years now. but you know what happened today in congress? congress, despite being stalled on pretty much everything, today congress extended fisa, extended the federal government spying powers and did it quickly, like that. the republican-led house passed a bill in the fall with a little help from democrats and the senate passed it today in an overwhelming vote of 73 yeas to 23 nays. president obama is expected to sign it. if you are a civil liberties guy, there was good news and bad news in this debate. the good news is that there were a bunch of privacy amendments, including one from democratic senator ron
tox s going to be tough to get over, but the name bill clinton comes to mind when you look at successful politicians remaking themselves. >> katon dawson, south carolina, appreciate it so much. see you at the silver dollar in charleston, my friend. >> absolutely, thank you, luke. >>> next, brand new information about what house republicans will be doing tomorrow. >>> plus, the bitter battle of president obama's second-term cabinet. you don't even have to be a nominee to be scoured these days. politico briefing is next, jake sherman, don't want to miss that. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... ...lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >>> the president cannot -- this white house cannot continue to float trial balloons and then not have them shot down. the president can't get perceived to being rolled by opponents. the problem that chuck hagel has,
scenario in terms of what the story really comes from. it reminded me a little bit of the clinton book and what people thought because he said it. it is in clinton's convention acceptance, they ran a film, the man from hope. this little small town in southwestern arkansas, the simplicity of rural life and in fact he's from hot springs, a completely different place, much more cosmopolitan and complex with a darker side. the obama story is that people so far his coquette to want to sir and of the story of barack obama senior and his father takes place somewhere else and that's where the african section of this book will start. >> host: two final questions. we want to introduce our viewers to [inaudible] >> guest: leo you could not make out. he belongs in some kind of african john cover a novel. he is 73 years old. he walks around this menacing club. he's got a depot into a cinema and seems to know everybody in africa. the form president of tanzania to idi amin the dictator of uganda back in the 70s and 80s to everybo
hillary clinton stop by with her chief of staff to wish me happy birthday birthday the first year she was in the senate. it was a few months after she had arrived and my staff was surprised and possibly a bit starstruck to see the former first lady walked into the room. we went on to work together. we were dedicated to empowering women, leaders, and social entrepreneurs in emerging economies. we also teamed up with a couple of other senators to ensure public schools have the option to offer single-sex schools and classes. after i visited rod page, a young woman's leadership academy in the harlem area of new york city, one of the first and most successful pilot projects for girls public schools. i remember the time i invited senator barbara to texas. we have worked together for so many years. we worked together on the appropriations committee for nasa. i wanted her to see the great work that they are doing their. -- there. then i took her to the houston rodeo. i want her to see the texas altculture. i'm not sure if she knew exactly how people would dress at the rodeo. suffice it to say
clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the state's. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have been a little bit slow. we had this conversation 10 years ago. now, i will stick my neck out and say for a variety of reasons, some of which are circumstantial, some of which have to do with the leadership in the standing committee come i believe that this topic will have to become an a more important topic. and that will be treated as all things are in china, top down. the truth is, fundamentals are not going to change unless there is a top down decision. so, in addition to that, i remember having a conversation with one of t
clinton knew you had to cut capital gains taxes to stimulate capital formation and investment that grew the economy in the '90s, pretty robustly, i think democrats would agree. so there is a whole set of things that have to be done in order to keep this economy out of dipping back into a recession which is why we have missed the real conversation set very well by democrats and republicans on the bipartisan debt commission. for every one dollar in increased revenue, we need four dollars in spending cuts. the president has failed to meet that level. >> you had a bill on the floor of the house, and boehner failed to get that pushed through. what happened there? >> that was -- boehner's leadership, without a doubt, i think, took a huge hit with that one, but that still represents one-tenth of the problem. where's the president's leadership on spending? >> that represents the entire problem. >> really? not according to the bipartisan debt commission. revenues represent the entire problem. >> this is the speaker of the house that can't do his job, that's what that represents, and he can't lea
with me. there was hatred. but i'm not alone in that. you can take the last three presidents, clinton, bush, obama and people haven't just disagreed with them, they've hated them. to me, that's really terrible. that's a cancer that's eating at our politics. >> rick: he also said that even with the last three presidents being worse than he's ever seen, the last two years have been absolutely the worse that there has been an amount of inability to work together and compromise and it's completely stopping our system from making progress. >> clayton: he's been praised by republicans and democrats, but also vilified by both republicans and democrats, thinking he's grand standing and an opportunist. i read his book called "in praise of public service." i love to read all the politicians books when they came out. he believed that no -- >> gretchen: i liked that -- >> clayton: it was a thin back. i could get through in a flight with big type and wide margins. he talked about -- he didn't think we needed any sort of caps or term limits. he believed that we should have it open ended. >> gretche
clinton on the welfare reform and president eisenhower and we have two words come presidential leadership on not just taxing rich people, we could tax all the rich people and cut their head off and it wouldn't help the fiscal cliff. we need to do prez both and i'm ready to work with him and so should a lot of other republicans and democrats. >> i think to get back -- i agree with everything largest said, but there's a tremendous duty. you've got a congress that has spent two years debating. we've written legislative language. i do want to hearken back to the fact that i offered back a bill that laid out all of these entitlement reforms that lamar supported but also revenues of almost a trillion dollars. i gave a copy of that bill to the white house -- >> right now to the u.s. senate. senators approved an extension of the foreign intelligence surveillance act, now considering amendments to a $60 billion hurricane ike sandy package. we expect a vote on two amendments to the hurricane relief bill. those from oklahoma senator tom coburn. for disaster assistance. it also would require the fede
full eligibility. at hearkens it hearkens back to a proposal in the clinton health care era in allowing people as young as 60 or maybe even 55 at 1.2 by ian at the full actuarial cost. any reaction to that via any of the panelists? >> it makes much less sense given the passage of the affordable care act. i think the issue that had been dealt with previously is that because there are individuals who, for whatever reason, no longer have other sources of insurance coverage in their pre-medicare years, would it be okay to let them buy and on an unsubsidized basis to the medicare pool. we don't have to do that now because we have the affordable care act, which will make insurance via either medicaid or the exchanges available to people in a group setting. so it doesn't mean, you could think about technically doing it that it does not make a lot of sense. >> i totally agree and my first reaction too is such a proposal in today's context would actually make those individuals were soft when it was brought over to the medicare program with the same set of subsidies that would be available to tho
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)